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  • So Who Is a Paid Intern Now? | Pennsylvania Benefit Consultants


    On January 5, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) created new guidance for determining whether a worker could be classified as an unpaid intern under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA requires “for-profit” employers to pay employees for their work. Interns, however, may not be classified as “employees” under the FLSA and therefore are not entitled to compensation for their work. The new rules give employers more flexibility in establishing unpaid internships.

    Under the previous six-factor test, an intern was considered an employee entitled to compensation unless all of the following factors were met:

    1. The internship, even though it included actual operation of the facilities of the employer, was similar to training that would be given in an educational environment;
    2. The internship experience was for the benefit of the intern;
    3. The intern did not displace regular employees, but worked under close supervision of existing staff;
    4. The employer that provided the training derived no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern, and on occasion its operations may actually have been impeded;
    5. The intern was not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
    6. The employer and the intern understood that the intern was not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

    In its new guidance (Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2018-2), the WHD has adopted the “primary beneficiary test,” favored by several federal Circuit Courts, as the standard for determining whether interns at for-profit employers are employees under the FLSA. The primary beneficiary test examines the economic reality of the intern-employer relationship to determine which party is the primary beneficiary of the relationship. The following seven factors are used to make this determination:

    1. The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand that there is no expectation of compensation. Any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests that the intern is an employee — and vice versa.
    2. The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to that which would be given in an educational environment, including the clinical and other hands-on training provided by educational institutions.
    3. The extent to which the internship is tied to the intern’s formal education program by integrated coursework or the receipt of academic credit.
    4. The extent to which the internship accommodates the intern’s academic commitments by corresponding to the academic calendar.
    5. The extent to which the internship’s duration is limited to the period in which the internship provides the intern with beneficial learning.
    6. The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than displaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern.
    7. The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is conducted without entitlement to a paid job after the internship.

    What is different now is that not ALL of the seven factors must be met in order to determine employee status. According to the WHD, no single factor is decisive and the determination must be made on the unique circumstances of each case.

    If analysis of these facts reveals that an intern is actually an employee, then he or she is entitled to both minimum wage and overtime pay under the FLSA. Conversely, if the analysis confirms that the intern or student is not an employee, then he or she is not entitled to either minimum wage or overtime pay under the FLSA.

    What This Means for Employers

    As a result of the new guidance, employers should review the status of any person working for them that they consider an “intern” and update their current internship programs to consider the WHD’s new rules.

    Originally published by www.ThinkHR.com

  • Nothing Is Certain, But Death and LESS Taxes… | Pennsylvania Benefit Advisors

    On January 11, 2018, the Internal Revenue Service released its income tax withholding tables for 2018 reflecting changes made by the December 2017 tax reform legislation. The updated withholding information provides the new rates for employers to use during 2018. Employers are encouraged to use these tables as soon as possible but must use them by no later than February 15, 2018. Employers should continue to use the 2017 withholding tables until they implement the 2018 withholding tables.

    According to the U.S. Treasury, an estimated 90 percent of paycheck recipients are likely to see an increase in their take-home pay by February. However, when employees see these changes in their paychecks depends on how quickly the new tables are implemented by their employers and how often they are paid (usually weekly, biweekly, or semimonthly).

    To help individuals identify the correct amount of withholding, the IRS is releasing a revised withholding calculator by the end of February, which will be posted on IRS.gov. The IRS encourages taxpayers to use the calculator to adjust their withholding once it is released.

    Changes for 2018 and Looking Forward

    The new law makes many changes for 2018 that affect individual taxpayers, including an increase in the standard deduction, repeal of personal exemptions, and changes in tax rates and brackets. In relation to Form W-4, these new withholding tables are designed to work with employees’ current W-4, as filed with their employer; so, there are no steps employees must currently take regarding the new tables and law.

    The IRS is also working on revising the Form W-4 to reflect the newly available itemized deductions, increases in the child tax credit, the new dependent credit, and repeal of dependent exemptions. However, there is no set release date for the revised form.

    Once released, employees may use the new Form W-4 to update their withholding in response to the new law or changes in their personal circumstances in 2018, and by workers starting a new job. Until a new Form W-4 is issued, employees and employers should continue to use the 2017 Form W-4.

    For Now

    At this time, employers should be reviewing these new tables and implementing necessary changes. For 2019, the IRS has said that it anticipates making even more changes involving withholding. But don’t despair; the agency provides FAQs, which employers and employee may find useful, and pledges to work with the business and payroll community to encourage workers to file new Forms W-4 next year while sharing information on changes in the new tax law that impact withholding.

    Stay tuned though, because 2018 has only just begun.

    By Samantha Yurman

    Originally published by www.ThinkHR.com

  • Oral Health = Overall Health | PA Benefit Consultants

    Have you heard the saying “the eyes are the window to your soul”? Well, did you know that your mouth is the window into what is going on with the rest of your body? Poor dental health contributes to major systemic health problems. Conversely, good dental hygiene can help improve your overall health.  As a bonus, maintaining good oral health can even REDUCE your healthcare costs!

    Researchers have shown us that there is a close-knit relationship between oral health and overall wellness. With over 500 types of bacteria in your mouth, it’s no surprise that when even one of those types of bacteria enter your bloodstream that a problem can arise in your body. Oral bacteria can contribute to:

    1. Endocarditis—This infection of the inner lining of the heart can be caused by bacteria that started in your mouth.
    2. Cardiovascular Disease—Heart disease as well as clogged arteries and even stroke can be traced back to oral bacteria.
    3. Low birth weight—Poor oral health has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight of newborns.

    The healthcare costs for the diseases and conditions, like the ones listed above, can be in the tens of thousands of dollars. Untreated oral diseases can result in the need for costly emergency room visits, hospital stays, and medications, not to mention loss of work time. The pain and discomfort from infected teeth and gums can lead to poor productivity in the workplace, and even loss of income. Children with poor oral health miss school, are more prone to illness, and may require a parent to stay home from work to care for them and take them to costly dental appointments.

    So, how do you prevent this nightmare of pain, disease, and increased healthcare costs? It’s simple! By following through with your routine yearly dental check ups and daily preventative care you will give your body a big boost in its general health. Check out these tips for a healthy mouth:

    • Maintain a regular brushing/flossing routine—Brush and floss teeth twice daily to remove food and plaque from your teeth, and in between your teeth where bacteria thrive.
    • Use the right toothbrush—When your bristles are mashed and bent, you aren’t using the best instrument for cleaning your teeth. Make sure to buy a new toothbrush every three months. If you have braces, get a toothbrush that can easily clean around the brackets on your teeth.
    • Visit your dentist—Depending on your healthcare plan, visit your dentist for a check-up at least once a year. He/she will be able to look into that window to your body and keep your mouth clear of bacteria. Your dentist will also be able to alert you to problems they see as a possible warning sign to other health issues, like diabetes, that have a major impact on your overall health and healthcare costs.
    • Eat a healthy diet—Staying away from sugary foods and drinks will prevent cavities and tooth decay from the acids produced when bacteria in your mouth comes in contact with sugar. Starches have a similar effect. Eating healthy will reduce your out of pocket costs of fillings, having decayed teeth pulled, and will keep you from the increased health costs of diabetes, obesity-related diseases, and other chronic conditions.

    There’s truth in the saying “take care of your teeth and they will take care of you”.  By instilling some of the these tips for a healthier mouth, not only will your gums and teeth be thanking you, but you may just be adding years to your life.

  • New Year, New Penalties | PA Benefit Advisors

    Department of Labor Publishes Updated Penalties for OSHA Violations

    On January 2, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published updated, inflation-adjusted penalties for violations of various laws regulated by the DOL and its internal components or divisions, including the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). The DOL is required to adjust the level of civil monetary penalties for inflation by January 15 each year pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Inflation Adjustment Act).

    Because of the Inflation Adjustment Act, rates for OSHA penalties have increased three times in the last 17 months (August 1, 2016, January 13, 2017, and January 2, 2018). Therefore, for violations occurring after November 2, 2015, the penalty amounts incurred by employers will depend on when the penalty is assessed, as follows:

    • If the penalty was assessed after August 1, 2016 but on or before January 13, 2017, then the August 1, 2016 penalty level applies.
    • If the penalty was assessed after January 13, 2017 but on or before January 2, 2018, then the January 13, 2017 penalty level applies.
    • If the penalty was assessed after January 2, 2018, then the current penalty level applies.

    The applicable January 2, 2018 penalty levels for violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) are as follows:

    • Willful violations: $9,239 – 129,936 (up from $9,054 – $126,749 after January 13, 2017 and $8,908 – $124,709 after August 1, 2016)
    • Repeated violations: $129,936 (up from $126,749 after January 13, 2017 and $124,709 after August 1, 2016)
    • Serious violations: $12,934 (up from $12,675 after January 13, 2017 and $12,471 after August 1, 2016)
    • Other-than-serious violations: $12,934 (up from $12,675 after January 13, 2017 and $12,471 after August 1, 2016)
    • Failure to correct violations: $12,934 (up from $12,675 after January 13, 2017 and $12,471 after August 1, 2016)
    • Posting requirement violations: $12,934 (up from $12,675 after January 13, 2017 and $12,471 after August 1, 2016)

    These increases apply to states with federal OSHA programs and states with OSHA-approved state plans. Violations occurring on or before November 2, 2015 are assessed at pre-August 1, 2016 levels.

    Employers are encouraged to familiarize themselves with these increased penalties and consult counsel if they have questions about the penalty level applicable to a potential violation.

    By Nicole Quinn-Gato

    Originally published by www.ThinkHR.com

  • Driving in to 2018 | PA Benefit Advisors

    How Changes to the Mileage Reimbursement Rate and Qualified Transportation Benefits Will Impact Employers in 2018

    On December 14, 2017, the Internal Revenue Service released the 2018 standard mileage rates used to calculate deductible costs of operating vehicles for business purposes. The rate increased by one cent  from 53.5 cents in 2017 to 54.5 cents in 2018. Employers who adopt the IRS standard mileage reimbursement rate in their employee handbook or other employment policy will need to update their reimbursement practices to reflect this change.

    Additionally, as we previously reported, the tax plan signed into law by President Trump on December 22, 2017 impacts qualified transportation benefits (also known as commuter benefits). In the past, employers could deduct the amount they provide toward an employee’s qualified parking, transit passes, or vanpool expenses up to certain federal limits ($255 in 2017 and $260 in 2018) as a business expense. However, under the new tax law, employers can no longer deduct this expense beginning in 2018. Moreover, while employees can continue to exclude qualified parking and transit benefits from their income, qualified bicycle commuting expenses will no longer be excludable.

    The tax law requires the Secretary of Treasury to issue regulations or other guidance as necessary to implement these changes; however, the law goes into effect for all amounts paid or incurred after December 31, 2017. Employers who have already budgeted for 2018 may need to review their assumptions to measure the impact of these taxable expenses.

    Employers should consult tax or legal professionals to determine the best options for handling parking and other commuter policies should they want to change existing policies.

    By Nicole Quinn-Gato

    Originally published by www.ThinkHR.com

  • IRS Extends Deadline for Employers to Furnish Forms 1095-C and 1095-B | PA Benefit Advisors

    On December 22, 2017, the IRS released Notice 2018-06 to extend the due date for employers to furnish 2017 Form 1095-C or 1095-B under the Affordable Care Act’s employer reporting requirement. Employers will have an extra 30 days to prepare and distribute the 2017 form to individuals. The due dates for filing forms with the IRS are not extended.

    Background

    Applicable large employers (ALEs), who generally are entities that employed 50 or more full-time and full-time-equivalent employees in 2016, are required to report information about the health coverage they offered or did not offer to certain employees in 2017. To meet this reporting requirement, the ALE will furnish Form 1095-C to the employee or former employee and file copies, along with transmittal Form 1094-C, with the IRS.

    Employers, regardless of size, that sponsored a self-funded (self-insured) health plan providing minimum essential coverage in 2017 are required to report coverage information about enrollees. To meet this reporting requirement, the employer will furnish Form 1095-B to the primary enrollee and file copies, along with transmittal Form 1094-B, with the IRS. Self-funded employers who also are ALEs may use Forms 1095-C and 1094-C in lieu of Forms 1095-B and 1094-B.

    Extended Due Dates

    Specifically, Notice 2018-06 extends the following due dates:

    • The deadline for furnishing 2017 Form 1095-C, or Form 1095-B, if applicable, to employees and individuals is March 2, 2018 (extended from January 31, 2018).
    • The deadline for filing copies of the 2017 Forms 1095-C, along with transmittal Form 1094-C (or copies of Forms 1095-B with transmittal Form 1094-B), if applicable, remains unchanged:
      • If filing by paper, February 28, 2018.
      • If filing electronically, April 2, 2018.

    The extended due date applies automatically so employers do not need to make individual requests for the extension.

    More Information

    Notice 2018-06 also extends transitional good-faith relief from certain penalties to the 2017 employer reporting requirements.

    Lastly, the IRS encourages employers, insurers, and other reporting entities to furnish forms to individuals and file reports with the IRS as soon as they are ready.

    Originally posted by www.ThinkHR.com

  • I Have Life Insurance Through My Employer. Why Do I Need Another Policy? | PA Benefit Advisors


    One of the perks of having a full-time job with a good company is the benefits package that comes with it. Often, those benefits include life insurance coverage, which is great. And everyone who can get life insurance at work should definitely take it, as there are many advantages to company-funded life insurance, also known as group life insurance. These advantages include:

    1. Easy qualification. Often, enrollment into group life insurance is automatic. That means everyone qualifies, as there is no medical exam required. So people who have preexisting health conditions, like diabetes or previous heart attack, can get life insurance at work, and may get a better rate compared with what an individual life insurance policy might cost them.

    2. Lower costs. Employers’ insurance plans tend to be paid for or subsidized by the company, giving you life insurance at a low cost or even free. You may even have the option to buy additional coverage at low rates. Costs tend to be lower for many people because with group plans, the cost per individual goes down as the plan enlarges.

    3. Convenience. It’s easy to subscribe to an employer’s life insurance plan without much effort on your part and if a payment is required, it’s easily deducted from your paycheck in much the same way as your medical costs are deducted.

    These are all great advantages, but are these the only considerations that matter when it comes to life insurance? The answer, of course, is no.

    “Life insurance should first and foremost fit the purpose—it should meet your needs.”

    Life insurance should first and foremost fit the purpose—it should meet your needs. And the primary purpose of life insurance is to care for those left behind in the event of your death. With group life insurance, it’s often set at one or two times your annual salary, or a default amount such as $25,000 or $50,000. While this sounds like a lot of money, just think of how long that would last your loved ones. What would they do once that ran out?

    There are several other disadvantages to relying on group insurance alone:

    1. If your job situation changes, you’ll lose your coverage. Whether the change results from being laid off, moving from full-time to part-time status or leaving the job, in most cases, an employee can’t retain their policy when they leave their job.

    2. Coverage may end when you retire or reach a specific age. Many people tend to lose their insurance coverage when they continue working past a specified age or when they retire. This means losing your insurance when you need it most.

    3. Your employer can change or terminate the coverage. And that can be without your consent, since the contract is between your employer and the insurer.

    4. Your options are limited. This type of coverage is not tailored to your specific needs. Furthermore, you may not be able to buy as much coverage as you need, leaving you exposed.

    Importance of Buying a Separate Life Insurance Policy
    It’s for these reasons you should get an individual life insurance policy that you personally own, in addition to any group life insurance you have. Individual life insurance plans offer superior benefits, and regardless of your employer or employment status, they remain in place and can be tailored to meet your needs and circumstances.

    Most importantly, an individual life insurance policy will fit the purpose for which you purchase it—to ensure your dependents continue to have the financial means to keep their home and lifestyle in the unfortunate event that you’re no longer there to care for them.

    By Frank Medina

    Originally posted by www.LifeHappens.org

  • Utilize FSA Monies with Key Year–End Strategies | PA Benefit Advisors

    ‘Tis the Season’. Like most, you ‘re probably in the midst of the “hussle and bussle” of this holiday season with dinners, parties, and activities; Christmas shopping; and spending those remaining FSA dollars you have allocated this year.

    Wait, what? Yes, you read right. Chances are, if you’ve opted to utilize an employer-sponsored FSA account in 2017, you may have remaining funds you’ll need to spend. This is especially true if your employer opted for the $500 carryover rule in lieu of a grace period. Regardless of what flexible spending account you have, here are some strategies to get the most out of this benefit before year end.

    Medical Care

    Medical FSAs are the most common supplemental flexible coverage offered under employer benefit plans. If you’ve elected this coverage for 2017, here are a few things to consider when spending these funds.

    Routine and Elective Medical Procedures

    Whether routine or not, now’s the time to get appointments booked. If your employer offers a grace period for turning in receipts, you can book appointments into the first couple of months of the New Year and get reimbursed from this year’s funds without affecting 2018’s contributions. This has a two-fold advantage, as you can also spread next year’s deductible over the coming year.

    Several routine and elective procedures that are FSA-eligible include:

    • Lasik
    • Sleep Apnea/Snoring
    • Hernia surgery
    • Colonoscopy
    • Smoking/Weight Loss Cessation Programs

    Alternative Therapies

    Under IRS law, certain alternative therapies are eligible for reimbursement. Acupuncture and chiropractic care, alternative medicinal treatments, and herbal supplements and remedies are a great way to use up your funds for the year and get a little cash back when you most need it.

    Dental

    Dental benefits often work differently than medical coverage. According to the American Dental Association, this benefit is often capped annually – generally between $1,000 and $3,000.  If you have unused funds remaining in your FSA, now may be the time to schedule a last-minute appointment with your dentist, especially if you might need serious work down the road. This way, you can use up the funds remaining in your account by year-end, and reduce your out-of-pocket expense next year by sharing the cost of additional dental services over a longer period of time.

    Prescription Refills

    Refilling your prescription medications at year end are a great way to use up your funds in your medical FSA. Take inventory of your prescription drugs, toss out expired ones, and make that call for a refill to your doctor or pharmacy.

    Over the Counter Drugs, Medical Equipment and Supplies

    Many OTC medications, medical equipment and supplies are eligible for reimbursement under a medical FSA. First-aid kits, blood-pressure monitors, thermometers, and joint braces are just a few.  Please note that some will require a note or prescription from your doctor.

    Mileage and Other Healthcare-Related Extras

    Traveling to and from any medical facility for appointments or treatment are eligible for reimbursement under your FSA. This not only includes traveling by your own vehicle, but also by bus, train, plane, ambulance service; and does include parking fees and tolls.

    In addition, you can get reimbursed for other health-related expenses. These include:

    • Lodging and meals during a medical event.
    • Medical conferences concerning an illness of you or one of your dependents.
    • Advance Payments on a retirement home or long-term care.

    Dependent Care

    If you have opted to contribute to a DCFSA, you can get reimbursed for day care, preschool, summer camps and non-employer sponsored before and after school programs. In addition, funds contributed to this type of FSA can be used for elderly daycare if you’re covering more than 50% your parent’s maintenance costs.

    Adoption Assistance

    If you are contributing to an Adoption Assistance FSA offered by your employer, you can get reimbursed for any expenses incurred in the process of legally adopting an eligible child. Eligible expenses include adoption fees, attorney fees and court costs, medical expenses for a child prior to being placed for adoption, and related travel costs in association with the adoption process.

    Make the most out of your FSA contributions by using the above strategies to your advantage as we close out 2017. As you move into 2018, review the maximum contribution guidelines for the coming year as set by the IRS, and establish a game plan on expenditures next year. Seek your HR department’s expertise for guidelines and tips they can give you to maximize this valuable benefit package.

  • You Think You Won’t Qualify for Life Insurance, but You’re Wrong | PA Benefit Advisors


    Think you can’t qualify for life insurance? Think again.

    You want to protect your loved ones for the future once you’re no longer around to provide for them. We all do. Life insurance gives you that peace of mind that your family will be taken care of after you’re gone.

    However, you’re also worried that your health issues mean you won’t qualify for life insurance because it is meant for healthy people only. So what do you do?

    Don’t despair—there is good life insurance out there for you! Whether you have diabetes, heart disease, mental health issues, kidney or liver problems, or almost any other health condition, you can qualify for life insurance!

    Looking at the Big Picture
    About 85% of consumers agree that most people need life insurance, but only 59% are actually insured, according to the 2017 Insurance Barometer Study by Life Happens and LIMRA. Why?

    Let’s look at the facts. There are plenty of reasons why someone may not have life insurance or may not qualify for it, including:
    • Recent heart disease
    • Heart disease prior to the age of 50
    • Any recent major disease (cancer, liver, kidney issues)
    • Major mental health issues (such as suicide attempts)
    • Kidney and/or liver disease
    • Wrongly assuming they won’t qualify

    Surprised by that last point? You’re not alone. Many Americans wrongly assume they won’t qualify for life insurance, and thus, never attempt to get insured. We are here to put an end to the myth that only healthy people can get life insurance.

    “We are here to put an end to the myth that only healthy people can get life insurance.”

    Overcoming Roadblocks
    Actually, almost any health history can be insured. The right company can get you insured at an affordable rate, even if you are dealing with any of the issues I listed above.

    Take a man in his late 40s, who had suffered a severe heart attack in his early 40s, and while he had been declined elsewhere, we were able to find a company that would insure him.

    Another great example is mental health issues, many times consumers with mood disorder and or depression with multiple medications are not insurable. But every company’s underwriting department has unique needs to fill, so recently an individual who had been declined multiple times for mood disorder was able to secure permanent insurance because he has a steady job, and the mental health issues didn’t impact his daily living.

    If you are dealing with health conditions, life insurance companies love seeing that you’re working to improve or properly maintain your health.

    So if you are over 50, have had heart disease, and it has been resolved for a few years, you can qualify for life insurance.

    If you control your diabetes through diet and medication, you can qualify.

    If you maintain your mental health with medication and lead a normal life, you can qualify.

    Basically, follow your doctor’s orders and you are much more likely to qualify. And that means being able to get financial protection with life insurance that your loved ones need and deserve.

    By Sam Goldsmith

    Originally posted by www.LifeHappens.org

  • L.R. WEBBER ASSOCIATES, INC. WELCOMES NEW STAFF VICE PRESIDENT!

    Duncansville, PA, December 11, 2017– L.R. Webber Associates, Inc. (LRW) is pleased to announce and welcome Holly Rosini as Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Business Development.  Rosini will be responsible for building and maintaining key relationships, ongoing strategic planning, and assistance with acquisition and implementation of new opportunities to propel the agency forward.

    Rosini joins LRW following a successful 30-year career with LeadingAge PA, An Association of Not-for-Profit Senior Services, where she most recently held the position of Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer.  During her tenure at LeadingAge PA, she had responsibility for overall Association operations, which included:  finance, human resources, education/event planning, research, communications & marketing, sales & business development, governance & strategic planning.   Rosini was instrumental in the Association’s financial growth and stability, as well as spearheading numerous projects, events and membership activities that elevated the Association to being highly respected by its members, constituents and peers.  With a customer service approach always at the forefront, she developed and maintained deep and far-reaching relationships in the senior services/healthcare arena and various specialties supporting those markets.  Her early career began in banking, and she has various education and specialized training in finance, banking, IT, human resources and leadership development.

    “I am honored and thrilled to be a part of the LRW team.  I have spent my entire career with a desire to do work that creates true value in the lives of others.  I know that LRW shares this philosophy and exhibits this in their service delivery to all clients.  I look forward to contributing to their mission and overall success.”

    Booker Moore, L.R. Webber Associates, Inc. CEO states: “We are very excited to welcome Holly to our team here at LRW.  She brings a wealth of knowledge, credibility and respect with her within the LeadingAge community here in PA and around the country.  Additionally, Holly will be able to assist us with strategic initiatives in our other industry niches and new endeavors as we expand our footprint in the Mid-Atlantic states.  We are very happy that she shares the same passion and enthusiasm for our mission”

    LRW has helped employers implement long-term strategic employee benefit plans since 1976. They deliver practical and effective claims and coverage support services while reducing the administrative and cost burden. LRW specializes in the financial services and health care industries.  If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Brad Webber at 814.695.8066 or email at bwebber@lrwebber.com.

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